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First Visit

According to AAPD (American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry) guidelines, infants should initially visit the pediatric dentist around the time of their first birthday.  First visits can be stressful for parents, especially for parents who have dental phobias themselves.

It is imperative for parents to continually communicate positive messages about dental visits (especially the first one), and to help the child feel as happy as possible about visiting the dentist.

How can I prepare for my child’s first dental visit?

Pediatric dentists are required to undergo extensive training in child psychology.  Their dental offices are generally colorful, child-friendly, and boast a selection of games, toys, and educational tools.  Pediatric dentists (and all dental staff) aim to make the child feel as welcome as possible during all visits.

There are several things parents can do to make the first visit enjoyable.  Some helpful tips are listed below:

Take another adult along for the visit – Sometimes infants become fussy when having their mouths examined.  Having another adult along to soothe the infant allows the parent to ask questions and to attend to any advice the dentist may have.

Leave other children at home – Other children can distract the parent and cause the infant to fuss.  Leaving other children at home (when possible) makes the first visit less stressful for all concerned.

Avoid threatening language – Pediatric dentists and staff are trained to avoid the use of threatening language like “drills,” “needles,” “injections,” and “bleeding.”  It is imperative for parents to use positive language when speaking about dental treatment with their child.

Provide positive explanations – It is important to explain the purposes of the dental visit in a positive way.  Explaining that the dentist “helps keep teeth healthy” is far better than explaining that the dentist “is checking for tooth decay and might have to drill the tooth if decay is found.”

Explain what will happen – Anxiety can be vastly reduced if the child knows what to expect.  Age-appropriate books about visiting the dentist can be very helpful in making the visit seem fun. Here is a list of parent and dentist-approved books:

  • The Berenstain Bears Visit the Dentist – by Stan and Jan Berenstain.
  • Show Me Your Smile: A Visit to the Dentist – Part of the “Dora the Explorer” Series.
  • Going to the Dentist – by Anne Civardi.
  • Elmo Visits the Dentist – Part of the “Sesame Street” Series.

What will happen during the first visit?

There are several goals for the first dental visit.  First, the pediatric dentist and the child need to get properly acquainted.  Second, the dentist needs to monitor tooth and jaw development to get an idea of the child’s overall health history.  Third, the dentist needs to evaluate the health of the existing teeth and gums.  Finally, the dentist aims to answer questions and advise parents on how to implement a good oral care regimen.

The following sequence of events is typical of an initial “well baby checkup”:

  1. Dental staff will greet the child and parents.
  2. The infant/family health history will be reviewed (this may include questionnaires).
  3. The pediatric dentist will address parental questions and concerns.
  4. More questions will be asked, generally pertaining to the child’s oral habits, pacifier use, general development, tooth alignment, tooth development, and diet.
  5. The dentist will provide advice on good oral care, how to prevent oral injury, fluoride intake, and sippy cup use.
  6. The infant’s teeth will be examined. Generally, the dentist and parent sit facing each other.  The infant is positioned so that his or her head is cradled in the dentist’s lap.  This position allows the infant to look at the parent during the examination.
  7. Good brushing and flossing demonstrations will be provided.
  8. The state of the child’s oral health will be described in detail, and specific recommendations will be made.  Recommendations usually relate to oral habits, appropriate toothpastes and toothbrushes for the child, orthodontically correct pacifiers, and diet.
  9. The dentist will detail which teeth may appear in the following months.
  10. The dentist will outline an appointment schedule and describe what will happen during the next appointment.

If you have questions or concerns about your child’s first dental visit, please contact our office.

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Testimonials

My mother is in a nursing home in Harrisville Michigan. She dropped her dentures and broke a tooth. The entire staff was in her room trying to find the broken tooth, but it must have fallen into the heat register or something. Anyway it never turned up. My brother, Rick, went to visit and called to tell me about it. "We have to do something," he told me. "I can't stand to see mom looking like this." He was planning to take a few days off and take me up north to see about getting her to the dentist to get her plate fixed. I went online and called several dentists in the area. They could not help me with the problem. Then I found Dr. Gregg Resnick DDS in Alpena. He said he could fix them and have them ready by the next day. I had our friends, Shirley and Tom Harmon, pick up the plate and take it to his office. The doctor called me (I live over 200 miles from where my mom is). Dr. Resnick was concerned that he might not be able to grind the tooth properly and that my mom wouldn't be able to chew properly. You see he was under the impression she had a full set of dentures and didn't realize that she had some lower teeth. He told me that although the tooth was broken mom would not have a problem chewing with it that way. "But, we do have a problem," I told him. "My brother can't stand to look at her with that broken tooth." He sighed and said, "Let's do it then." I could have hugged him through the phone. I promised him that if mom had a problem chewing that I would bring her handicap van and get her to his office the next day. Well, mom got her plate today. She ate dinner and said that she could chew just fine. I have Dr. Resnick to thank for this. He did me a favor and it worked out just fine. I wish there were more dentists like him. He and his staff gave me 5 star service.

Sandra C.

My name is Brad Boehm. I am a local physician in Alpena, Michigan. I had an erosion problem with my teeth that made them appear yellow and deformed. I went to see a cosmetic dentist in Atlanta, Georgia. The repair work to my teeth including veneers was over $70,000. I came home very depressed. While at a routine cleaning I discussed this with Dr. Gregg Resnick, my new dentist. He formulated a treatment plan that was identical to the plan from Georgia at less than one-third the cost. I am sure the cost in Georgia included partial rent payment for the mansion the clinic was located in.

I chose to have my teeth fixed by Dr Resnick and I truly could not be happier! During the treatment process minor adjustments were made. This required a quick end of the day visit to see Dr. Resnick instead of a day or two wasted flying to Atlanta. My family and friends comment all the time about my teeth and how I smile so much more. I would recommend Dr. Resnick to anyone who wishes to improve their smile.

Dr. Boehm

I first met Dr. Resnick 20 years ago when referred by a friend for emergency care. Now Nancy and I are thankful he has been our dentist ever since. We think of our appointments as going to an office where we will be treated as friends, not only by him, but also by the staff.

Dr. Resnick is always calm, patient, encouraging and knowledgeable in dental care. His staff reflects his demeanor. Furthermore, he is an interesting guy.

He is always interested in patients as individuals outside of the office. I remember telling him of impending surgery and later he called me at home to encourage and wish me well.

We recommend him to all our friends.

Robert and Nancy Sloan

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